Iowa Progressive Caucus endorses six city candidates

Iowa’s local elections are nonpartisan, but Bleeding Heartland welcomes endorsements of Democratic or progressive candidates for city offices or school boards. Please contact Laura Belin if you are interested in writing.

The Progressive Caucus of the Iowa Democratic Party is proud to announce its first slate of endorsements for the 2021 municipal election cycle. These candidates have been identified as those who exemplify the goals and values of the Progressive Movement. They use their campaigns and platforms to amplify the voice and concerns of marginalized individuals and bring attention to issues of social, economic, and environmental justice.

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Governor, Ankeny mom worked to undermine COVID-19 safety in schools

“I believe that parental control is local control,” Governor Kim Reynolds told WHO-TV’s Dave Price earlier this month. “I think you’re going to see some interesting school board races this year also,” she added with a smirk.

This past weekend, Reynolds recounted how she “strategized” with Ankeny parent Sarah Barthole last year to force Iowa schools to abandon hybrid models, which allowed for social distancing in classrooms.

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Our Revolution Iowa endorses Indira Sheumaker for Des Moines City Council

Editor’s note: Ward 1 covers much of the north and west sides of Des Moines. Bleeding Heartland welcomes guest posts endorsing Democratic or progressive candidates for local offices.

With the following official statement, Our Revolution Iowa has endorsed Indira Sheumaker for Des Moines City Council Ward 1, in the November 2 election:

“Indira Sheumaker actively displays the best in community organizing in her commitment to have the Des Moines City Council enact progressive policies put forth by Des Moines groups she has helped lead over the past year,” said Pete D’Alessandro, Organizing Committee Member of OR Iowa.

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Tiara Mays for Johnston school board

Editor’s note: Iowa school board elections are happening on Tuesday, November 2. Bleeding Heartland welcomes guest commentaries advocating for Democratic or progressive candidates running for these nonpartisan offices. Please contact Laura Belin if you are interested in writing.

Tiara L. Mays is running for an at-large seat on the Johnston Community School District Board of Education.

Tiara has lived in the Johnston community for more than six years and is a parent of a student within the district. She is a dedicated central Des Moines area community leader and volunteer who works with youth and collegiate undergraduates both locally and statewide.

Tiara’s key priorities include:

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Climate change is on the ballot in Des Moines

Carolyn Uhlenhake Walker is a Des Moines resident and retired teacher.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently issued its Sixth Assessment Report on the Physical Science Basis of climate change. The report pulls together the best scientific knowledge about climate change, and it’s clear that the situation is more dire than ever. Human-caused climate change is undeniable. Its scale and scope are unprecedented, and its impacts are already being felt. Significant climate changes are inevitable, and we need to do everything we can to stem the bleeding. 

At a bare minimum, every elected official should recognize the climate crisis and be committed to meet it head on.

That’s why I’m disturbed a climate denier, Cory McAnelly, is running to unseat Josh Mandelbaum, a climate champion on the Des Moines City Council.

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Democrats keep majority on Johnston city council

Bryan Burkhardt won the June 22 special election for a Johnston City Council seat despite a strong write-in campaign by local Republicans on behalf of Jim Gorsche. Unofficial results posted by the Polk County auditor’s office showed 1,032 votes for Burkhardt (51.1 percent), 783 write-in votes (38.8 percent), all but six of which were for Gorsche, and 203 votes for Adam Haar (10.1 percent).

Turnout was just under 14 percent, not bad for a summer local election, which received little media coverage.

Burkhardt, a Des Moines Area Community College professor and small business owner, will serve the remainder of Scott Syroka’s term, which runs through 2023. Elected to the council in 2019, Syroka resigned early this year to serve as deputy director of communications in the Biden-Harris administration’s Office of Personnel Management. John Temple has been filling the vacancy on the council since February; he didn’t compete in the special election.

Local elections are nonpartisan in Iowa, but Burkhardt and Haar, the top two vote-getters in the city’s May 25 primary, both had support from area Democrats. Gorsche finished third in the four-way primary.

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